Naproxen Review

Naproxen Review

Naproxen is the generic form of a type of pain relief medication that belongs to the group of drugs called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Brand names of Naproxen include:

  • Naprosyn
  • Naprelan
  • Midol Extended Relief
  • Anaprox
  • Aleve 

How Does Naproxen Work?

The drug functions by lowering a number of hormones within the body that can cause inflammation and lead to pain. It is prescribed in order to treat either pain or inflammation or both, as it can reduce pain and swelling.

It is commonly used as a pain or inflammation reliever for various conditions such as:

  • Tendinitis
  • Bursitis
  • Menstrual cramps
  • Gout attacks
  • Arthritis
  • Dental pain
  • Ankylosing spondylitis. 

Common Side Effects 

Although many people take medications containing naproxen with no issues, especially when use as directed and for short-term use, common side effects that have been associated with this pain medication include (but are not necessarily limited to):

  • Upset stomach
  • Nausea
  • Heartburn
  • Headache
  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness

If any of these symptoms should persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly. 

This Medication is Not Ideal for Everyone

Though Naproxen pain medication is immensely useful, safe, and effective for many people, there are some who should not take this drug.

For example, if heart or circulation problems exist, this drug may be avoided as it could increase the risk of worsening those conditions to the point of heart attack or stroke.

The longer naproxen is taken, the greater this risk becomes. It should also not be taken ahead of bypass surgery on the heart – also known as a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Should any symptoms of circulation or heart issues occur during the use of naproxen, seek out emergency medical assistance right away. These symptoms could include:

  • Slurred speech
  • Weakness
  • Chest pain
  • Balance problems
  • Shortness of breath
  • Vision problems

Gastrointestinal problems can also occur as a result of the use of naproxen. This includes issues in both the stomach and intestines, such as bleeding or perforation (hole formation).

This type of condition can be exceptionally harmful or even fatal and can occur at any point throughout the use of naproxen. These serious side effects are a higher risk among older adults.

Still, should any symptoms of intestinal or stomach bleeding occur – regardless of your age – your doctor should be contacted immediately, such as stools that are bloody, black, or tar-like, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, or coughing up blood. If your doctor can’t be reached seek emergency attention.

It should also be noted that taking naproxen can also cause the skin to become more sensitive to sunlight, so sunburn could occur more quickly. As such, sun exposure should be limited.

Speak With Your Doctor Before Taking Naproxen

There are many medications that should not be used in conjunction with naproxen. For this reason, all medications (prescription and non-prescription) as well as nutritional and herbal supplements should be disclosed to the prescribing doctor before naproxen is taken.

Furthermore, if any drug or supplement is to be taken while on naproxen, it should first be discussed with a doctor or pharmacist. Even medicines as common as aspirin or allergy medications may change the way that naproxen works or could cause a drug conflict.

Finally, keep in mind that products containing naproxen may be prescribed to you by your doctor but they are also available in non-prescription forms sold over the counter. Regardless of whether you’ve been prescribed this drug or you are taking an OTC version, be sure to take it exactly as directed by your doctor or according to the manufacturer’s usage instructions.

Abusing this medication by taking more than the recommended dose or using it for longer than recommended can increase the risk of side effects, including those that are more serious. If you should feel you need to take a stronger dose of naproxen or you would like to use it for longer than recommended, inform your doctor immediately, even if you are taking a non-prescription product.

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>